Cloning: How far are we willing to go?

Ever since the topic of artificial intelligence came up it has really made me think about what it means to create artificial life forms. I believe in equal rights for everyone no matter what position in society that they may occupy so, of course, I believe that artificial life forms should be equal rights as well. The problem that I have though is in creating a life that is only going to be used for a specific purpose and is treated like an object in the process. This brings me to the heart of this blog: the process of cloning.

clones

Cloning is defined, in Wikipedia, as “…the process of producing similar populations of genetically identical individuals…” (“Cloning”). Cloning is an interesting concept and the genre of science fiction is the perfect place to represent it. I found a great movie that both explores and exposes cloning for what it really is. The Island, starring Ewan McGregor and Scarlett Johansson, follows two individuals who escape from the secured location where they are being held, once they discover that they are clones being used for particular means.

Now my question becomes, at what point do we put an end to creating lives when we don’t really even give them a chance to live a normal life?

2 thoughts on “Cloning: How far are we willing to go?”

  1. This is a very interesting opinion that I must concur with. The problem I think with cloning, in my opinion, stems from a moral belief that mankind is somehow different, or objective, from the rest of social beings that exist. The moral construction of cloning is one that states that we should not defy nature; this has merit only when we consider how the cloning is used. Your reference to the island reminds me of new technologies that are being used now to clone organs from pigs to use for those who require organ doning. Although we assume that clones are some type of other, I believe they are just as capable to producing an identity as a “normally” biological person.

  2. This is a very interesting opinion that I must concur with. The problem I think with cloning, in my opinion, stems from a moral belief that mankind is somehow different, or objective, from the rest of social beings that exist. The moral construction of cloning is one that states that we should not defy nature; this has merit only when we consider how the cloning is used. Your reference to the island reminds me of new technologies that are being used now to clone organs from pigs to use for those who require organ doning. Although we assume that clones are some type of other, I believe they are just as capable to producing an identity as a “normally” biological person.

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