Post 1: Observations

The site I have chosen to observe is a pond in a greater Vancouver regional park. The pond is approximately 500 meters long and 100 meters wide. It is surrounded by many trees and grasses and contains a variety of aquatic plants. The pond is located within a secondary growth temperate rainforest and is a rehabilitation site for at risk species (specifically, the western painted turtle). There is no parking lot nearby or a well marked trail that leads to the pond so this area does not receive as much human contact as the rest of the park. On the day of my visit the weather was overcast and the temperature was 12 degrees celsius at 3:30 p.m.  I walked around the entire pond and noted some interesting sites. There was a beaver dam and many fallen trees that were used by the ducks and geese to perch. I noticed that many of the submerged aquatic plants only grew on the west side of the pond and there was much more tree cover on the east side of the pond. Some questions that arose were:

  1. Why did certain areas of the pond have minimal or no organisms growing?
  2. Are the submerged aquatic plants less successful than the totally emergent aquatic plants?
  3. Does the tree cover have an effect on aquatic plant growth?
Mclean pond - Langley, British Columbia

Mclean pond – Langley, British Columbia

Beaver dam

Beaver dam

Various aquatic plants at the North end.

Various aquatic plants at the North end.

Perched ducks

Perched ducks.

 

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